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Author: jvdl

The Man in the Arena

The Man in the Arena

It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds;…

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One-time-pad encryption with R and basic JavaScript

One-time-pad encryption with R and basic JavaScript

One-time-pad encryption offers unbreakable* security if you can guarantee truly random number generation and security of the generated pad. Implementing it from the perspective of a cryptographic layman is a fun way to learn more about it and could add an extra layer of security to your most sensitive communications. I started off by trying to mimic the NSA example above. I eventually settled on a 169 character key (mapped as a 13 x 13 grid) as I struggled to…

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The Grief of One Dog

The Grief of One Dog

Perhaps it was the spirit of the time and the place that affected me. But I assure you no occurrence of any of my other battlefields impressed me so keenly. I halted on my tour to gaze on the spectacle, and to reflect on its meaning. This soldier, I realized, must have had friends at home and in his regiment; yet he lay there deserted by all except his dog… I had looked on, unmoved, at battles which decided the…

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Searching for a string in an entire SAS library

Searching for a string in an entire SAS library

For the most part, experienced SAS programmers know where to look for the source data they need. In the pharmaceutical industry, we are familiar with CDISC standards and data structures. However, should the data standard be unfamiliar or the source datasets include new or unusual parameters, it may be prudent to have SAS look through the data on your behalf to save time. We can do this by making use of PROC CONTENTS and SAS macro loops with the forward…

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NONMEM ADDL Calculation and Compression in SAS

NONMEM ADDL Calculation and Compression in SAS

ADDL represents the number of additional doses that are copies of the current row, with the time since first dose (RTFD) increased at the regular dosing interval (II). This allows for the compression of dose records in the NONMEM dataset. To put it more eloquently: The NONMEM data item ADDL on a dose record expresses the number of additional implicit doses that should follow at a regular interval II. In the case where explicit doses exist, ADDL supports compacting them…

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